Cradle to College
Vol. 19 No 3 | Spring 2017
One of the most rewarding aspects of being an O&G is the possibility of caring for women for extended periods of their life. This may start with seeing a young woman for contraceptive advice or pre-pregnancy counselling, caring for her during pregnancies and births, advising on gynaecological concerns, including menopause, and then seeing the baby that you helped at birth come with her mother as an adolescent with her own concerns. So we all need to have some understanding of the issues around paediatric and adolescent gynaecology.
FIND OUT MORE
Dr Asha Short
Feature
Congenital anomalies of the female genital tract
Dr Asha Short
Dr Jess McMicking
Feature
Contraception in adolescents
Dr Jess McMicking
Dr Amy Jamieson
Feature
Gynaecological malignancies
Dr Amy Jamieson

FROM THE ARCHIVE


Vol. 18 No 3 | Spring 2016
‘Hey baby, what’s your number?’
Dr Amanda Yunker
Vol. 18 No 4 | Summer 2016
Caesarean section: an evidence review
Dr Frances Hills
Vol. 19 No 2 | Winter 2017
The fetal bradycardia
Mark Beaves
Vol. 19 No 1 | Autumn 2017
Body-identical hormone therapy
A/Prof John Eden
Vol. 18 No 3 | Spring 2016
A model for consent: shared decision-making
Dr Samantha King
Vol. 19 No 2 | Winter 2017
Basic resuscitation
Dr Morgan Edwards
Vol. 18 No 4 | Summer 2016
Caesarean rate: rising tide or smooth seas?
Prof Steve Robson
Vol. 19 No 2 | Winter 2017
Hands off the breech
Dr Polly Weston
Vol. 16 No 1 | Autumn 2014
Acute management of OASIS
Dr J Oliver Daly
Vol. 19 No 1 | Autumn 2017
Perimenopause: treating the transition
A/Prof Helen Roberts
Vol. 16 No 1 | Autumn 2014
A simple guide to procidentia
Dr Chris Barry
Vol. 18 No 2 | Winter 2016
Realising the promise of precision oncology
Prof Andrew V Biankin
Prof Iain A McNeish
Contributor
The College’s flagship
quarterly publication
O&G Magazine features articles on the latest issues in the practice of obstetrics and gynaecology, written by experts of international standing. The magazine encourages the free flow of ideas, information and debate among the membership of the College and the broader community involved in women’s health.
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